Reality Breached 012 – Female Protagonists [Un-cut]

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Reality Breached is an in-depth look at the Video Game industry and its business practices. Our pundits break down parties involved and give their stance on pressing industry trends. It’s time to get deep ya’ll.

Episode Cast

Sergio Lugo, Reid Walker, and Josh Alcaraz

Episode Summary

This episode we look at female protagonist and why there aren’t many in Games. Everyone from Mrs. Pacman to Samus get the Rebre treatment. [Editor’s Note:] Towards the end, we discuss the new Tomb Raider game and give our personal opinions on the attempted rape controversy. Listener discretion is advised (more discretion than usual because everyone knows you should always use discretion when communicating with Reid).

I thought I might edit out the rape conversation, but the discussion was strong and while these three idiot dudes might have danced on the line of whats appropriate and inappropriate, some good points were made. Please send all hate mail to reidentski@hotmail.com -Sergio 🙂

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Comments

  1. Mark Wells says:

    Just play good rpg games, you can pick your sex, and you can even make an ugly women in many of them.

  2. liugeaux says:

    True, RPGs let you customize your character, but then that character is placed in a story that’s built to work with a number of different protagonist archetypes. This highlights an inherent problem with custom characters. Sure you can be anyone you want but rather than having a story tailored specifically to their character and personality, you end up with a dialog tree filled screen with generic choices that fit one of like 5 molds. With a true female fronted game, the entire experience is predicated on her personality, which we all know can and probably should be effected by her gender.

    1. Reid says:

      Femshep

      1. Reid says:

        Sorry, let me elaborate. Femshep in mass effect 1-3 is one of the few exceptions to what Sergio said to a degree. While you still have a ton of generic dialog for either gender, its really the responses of the other characters that do provide a gender separation and then their is minor dialog dedicated to both genders.